SCIENCE

  • What Plant Migrations Tell Us about Ourselves

    What Plant Migrations Tell Us about Ourselves New insights into why animals play, how to hunt an asteroid, and more books out now By Erica Berry An underwater view of a kelp forest. Credit: Brent Durand/Getty Images NONFICTION Dispersals: On Plants, Borders, and Belonging by Jessica J. Lee Catapult, 2024 ($27) As a child in Canada, Jessica J. Lee squirmed…

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  • Even ‘Twilight Zone’ Coral Reefs Aren’t Safe from Bleaching

    February 26, 2024 2 min read Even ‘Twilight Zone’ Coral Reefs Aren’t Safe from Bleaching Coral reefs hundreds of feet below the ocean surface aren’t as safe as scientists thought By Carolyn Wilke Recovering corals at the Chagos Archipelago. Credit: University of Plymouth As marine biologist Nicola Foster and her colleagues steered a remote-controlled submersible through the coral reefs of…

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  • The Life and Gruesome Death of a Bog Man Revealed after 5,000 Years

    Before he was bludgeoned to death and left in a Danish bog, an ancient individual now known as Vittrup Man was an emblem of past and future ways of living. He was born more than 5,000 years ago into a community of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers who probably lived in northern Scandinavia as their ancestors had for millennia. But Vittrup Man spent…

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  • Could Neanderthals Make Art? | Scientific American

    For centuries, the “Unicorn Cave,” or “Einhornhöhle,” in central Germany has been famous for its many thousands of bones. In medieval times, people thought the bones came from unicorns. But a few years ago, archaeologists excavating the cave unearthed an unusual object: a toe bone from a giant deer. The material itself was noteworthy: Although giant deer were once prey…

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  • How Did an Aquarium Stingray Get Pregnant without a Mate?

    February 18, 2024 3 min read Charlotte, a stingray in a small North Carolina aquarium, is taking a DIY approach to reproduction By Stephanie Pappas A stingray in a small aquarium in Hendersonville, N.C., has become pregnant—despite living in a tank without a male ray.  This seemingly miraculous event has stirred up online speculation that the expecting stingray, Charlotte, may…

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  • Solar Geoengineering Looks to Silicon Valley for New Wave of Funding

    CLIMATEWIRE | Climate scientists, environmental activists and philanthropists met privately last month to prepare for an expected surge of Silicon Valley funding related to last-ditch measures for slowing global warming. The two-day gathering on solar geoengineering — or efforts to increase the reflectivity of the planet through spraying particles into the stratosphere or altering cloud cover — shows how the…

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  • You Can’t Fix Burnout With Self-Care

    Anthony Montgomery: The most important part of burnout is that it’s about yourself, but it’s also about others. [CLIP: Opening music] Shayla Love: One of my New Year’s resolutions was to be less burned-out. Maybe you can relate; you think, ‘I’m going to better manage my stress this year. I’m going to make time for activities that I find nourishing…

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  • Embattled Climate Scientist Michael Mann Wins $1 Million in Defamation Lawsuit

    February 9, 2024 2 min read Michael Mann secured a win in his legal battle against conservative bloggers who said the climatologist “molested and tortured data” and compared him to a convicted child abuser By Pamela King & E&E News CLIMATEWIRE | Climate scientist Michael Mann on Thursday secured a win in his long-running legal battle against conservative bloggers who once…

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  • Coal Is Bad for the Environment. Is Liquified Natural Gas Any Better?

    CLIMATEWIRE | The White House decision to pause approvals of liquefied natural gas terminals has fed a contentious debate: Is LNG dirtier than coal? Many environmentalists argue that it is, challenging the conventional wisdom that gas is a sort of diet fossil fuel that could help reduce climate pollution as the energy system shifts to renewable power. But the picture is…

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  • Why Does a Solar Eclipse Move West to East?

    February 3, 2024 3 min read Here’s why the path of a solar eclipse travels in the opposite direction of that of the sun By Stephanie Pappas The sun rises in the east and sets in the west. A glimpse at the map of the April 2024 North American solar eclipse, however, shows a path from west to east. What…

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